Here Comes Spring

by Shamala Kandiah Thompson

While Paul has been running in tropical heat, getting sun-burnt and complaining about the humidity, I’ve been reveling in the mild weather in New York.  Spring has come early. Temperatures are in the 60s and 70s and the days are longer (partly thanks to the clocks being moved forward.) I love casting off the layers and feeling the sun’s warmth on my skin.

But the highlight for me at this time of year are the buds and blossoms that suddenly burst out. It’s a great season for a sometimes reluctant runner who loves taking photos. The promise of capturing spring’s arrival gives me the incentive I need to get out for a run immediately after work. Frequent stops to smell the flowers and take pictures can make runs a bit disjointed.  But I’ve learnt to just let nature lead the way on these runs. And I certainly wasn’t the only one one distracted from my exercise by the sights of Spring.

For the last three weeks I’ve been strapping my camera round my waist and heading up to Central Park at least once a week. I wanted to see the park slowly come to life as it casts off its winter garb.

In the first week of March the predominant colors were yellow and purple.

Just one tree showing signs of Spring around Gapstow Bridge but it was warm enough to sit and enjoy the view.

Crocuses are one of the earliest flowers to make an appearance in Central Park.

A cheerful sign that Spring has arrived.

My run in Central Park in the second week of March revealed trees sprouting brightly colored buds and flowers.

Magnolia buds about to burst into bloom.

And by the third week of March, after a week of unseasonably warm weather, many of the trees were in full bloom. unse

Flowering Forsythia livening up the landscape.

Looks like there might be easier ways than running to enjoy the Spring blossoms.

Pomona, Roman Goddess of Orchards and Gardens, appropriately framed by blossom-filled trees.

Saucer magnolia trees were in full bloom all over the park.

Now I can’t wait for the cherry blossom trees around the reservoir to start flowering.  Here’s a glimpse of what to expect:

Yoshino cherry trees in bloom along the east side of the Reservoir (Spring 2011).

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