Tag Archives: marathontraining

Race Report: Greater Manchester Marathon, UK, April 10, 2016

by Paul Thompson

Reason for Running

Eight years ago I ran the Boston Marathon in 2:38:52. The wheels came off soon after getting over the ‘summit’ of Heart Break Hill, just as they had at 22 miles in my two other marathons, London 2006 and London 2007. At the end I made one of those running vows – this was my last marathon. And like all running vows this was destined for the breakers yard. All it needed for it to give was self-discipline to slip, memory to wane, or curiosity to return. And so here I was standing on the start line of the Greater Manchester Marathon.

Having recently turned 50 I made another vow that trumped (that word’s on my mind a lot lately, hopefully not after November) the one I made eight years ago. To try and get a PR at the distance as an M50 (sorry British readers but masters has a far better ring to it than ‘veteran’, a term that conjures up images of those wounded in war rather than those that have mastered something). My PR, from Flora London Marathon 2006, was 2:29:56.

There was more to it than that. This was a distance I’d yet to conquer. My three previous attempts were poorly executed, a combination of irrational exuberance in the early miles and inadequate fueling. On all three occasions my racing was done at 22. I’d been defeated long before the finish line, the last 4 miles typically being a funereal march to just get to the end. I’d stopped competing with myself, with others, with anyone. Many of us have been there. Deep down I had to put that to rights. Or at least collapse trying.

Race Preparations

This time I had taken a few crucial extra steps (!) to maximize the chance of success. The main one being getting myself a coach who has a word class pedigree at marathon running and a philosophy that sits well with mine. Lee Troop. And to top things off, on the eve of the race, Lee revealed he’d finished 7th in the Commonwealth Games marathon held in Manchester in 2002.

This time round I was stronger, smarter, and better prepared than before. As well as Lee’s expert guidance since 2011 I’d been running long easy distance of 18-21 almost every weekend. This started more by accident than design, dictated by a Metro North train schedule for Peekskill to New York that left me with 2:30 to get a run done (with trains every hour of course I could have opted for 1:30 but then I needed to justify the 50 minute ride each way with at least as long a time running!). 26.2 was no longer intimidating. I’d also made regular visits to DrStu to keep me in running order and was popping some pills.

Heading into the race I made no secret I was doing it. And the words of encouragement – text, email, Facebook Messenger, Twitter, Strava, even face to face – boosted  motivation, pressure (living up to their lofty expectations) and accountability (explaining to them should I fail to meet those expectations). Thanks to all of you that sent me words of encouragement and / or congratulation.

I had three targets – an “ultimate” one of under 2:29:56, an “I’ll take that” one of under 2:33, and an “I’ll live with that” one of under 2:36. Why more than one? Well we need a goal to stretch us. But then if mid-race we find it beyond our reach we need an anchor to help us get safely ashore. And if that goal is beyond us we need something else that will keep us motivated to finish rather than throw in the towel – in this case catch the Manchester Metrolink to the finish!

The final count-down to race day had gone to plan. Sham and I were in Paris the previous weekend so I spent a few days running there with my final longish run on Sunday on the trails of the Bois de Boulogne, catching some of the Paris Marathon. In the final week I clocked 56 miles and as I tapered, simultaneously reducing the load and intensity, my legs started to feel fresher and the IT band steadily improved. Sham made sure I also stuck to Lee’s fuel plan, gradually moving to a largely carbohydrate diet in the final days.

On the Saturday, the Thompson Clan – my brother Stephen, hoping to run 7 minute miles and smash his PR, his wife, Lynn, and two boys, our parents, and Sham – drove to the Didsbury Travelodge located in a Manchester suburb conveniently located at the end of a Metrolink tram line. That afternoon we did a recce trip in to see the start and finish area, half a mile from a Metrolink station and collect my race number.

Red rose, Lancashire's symbol from the War of Roses, on gate to Emirates Old Trafford, Lancashire County Cricket Club's stadium

Red rose, Lancashire’s symbol from the War of Roses, on gate to Emirates Old Trafford, Lancashire County Cricket Club’s stadium.

Race Day

On Saturday morning, after an early breakfast of oatmeal and banana, Steve, Lynn, Sham and I rode the tram in and made our way to the start. I took a GU caffeine gel 30 minutes before the start. While thousands suddenly started descending on the start area it felt decidedly low key: no fencing in the runners and jostling for a good starting position. Athletes were casual and courteous. Altogether much less stressful than the Marathon Majors. The downside was that it did not have that big race feel. I was proved wrong.

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Runners arriving early at start area.

This was my first race in new club colors. I’d entered using my UK registered club of Kettering Town Harriers but was wearing my new Urban Athletics vest. Ever since settling in the New World in October 2004 I’ve run, through mainly thick and some thin, for Warren Street but it was time for a new chapter in my running. A new club, a stronger vibe, greater ambition, and more resources in form of store base and potential sponsorship. As well as being one of the best teams in the New York area for men and women the UA masters men and women can be the best in the US. But the main thing was that many of my old Warren Street buddies joined me at UA.

In the closing minutes Sham called me over to get a picture with Ron Hill. An athletic icon, famous for breaking all sorts of records, who at 77 is still looking incredibly fit. There’s a campaign to get him a knighthood. No one deserves the accolade more given his accomplishments and what he’s put into the sport.

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Talking to Ron Hill just before the start.

Race Start

Ron saw us off. The first few miles were out and back down a highway. By the second mile I was running with Michael Hargreaves of East Hull Harriers who was hoping to dip under 2:30. We passed the first mile in 5:28 and second in 5:29. As Salford Harrier Josh Tighe joined us I gently applied the brakes. But by 5 miles it was clear I was comfortably running 5:35-40 miles – ahead of my ultimate schedule but perhaps too fast for me to sustain.By this point I’d also come to understand what Lee meant by “Manchester’s roads are hard”. The stones laid down onto the tar are harder than the slick tar roads of the US.

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Trading strides with Michael Hargreaves of East Hull Harriers.

From miles 5-10, through the suburbs of Stretford and Sale, I was isolated but running strong in the 5:40 range. Soon after mile 9, a heavily spectated section,  I took my first GU gel. Suddenly I was slowed by a sharp deep pain in my left calf, similar to a pain I’d experienced a month earlier in training in new training shoes. Within a few hundred meters I’d gone from running at 2:28-29 pace to facing the prospect of an early retirement. My sudden slowing to around 6:00 pace helped a chasing group of four, led by Phill Taylor, catch me.

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Mile 9 with chasing pack of four closing in.

Half Way

I figured if I tough it out the pain might ease. And so it did, soon after settling into the pack of four who had joined me.We worked well as a group running at around 5:40 pace and taking turns leading. But at the half way point in Altrincham – the highest point of the course which the website boasts as one of the fastest in the world, faster even than Berlin and Chicago – passed in 1:13:34, Phill Taylor and James Turner broke away. I let them go as I was concerned I’d run the first half 2 minutes faster than I should have.

By mile 14 I found myself once again running solo. I slowed slightly and downed my second gel. I was now running 5:50 miles. Pacing was starting to prove difficult: tiredness makes basic maths a challenge and I’d also inadvertently stopped the Garmin for a few minutes. At around mile 18 I found myself gently accelerating and through 21 maintained 5:40-45 miles. I overtook Phil Taylor who had got away from me exiting Altrincham. And a lady on the roadside shouted “Good run young man”. The best cheer of the race even if inaccurate.

Closing Stages

For the first time in my marathon running career I found myself enjoying it and confident of a strong finish. It did not last. At 21 I was again struck by sharp pain in my calf, only this time the left one. This forced a slowing in my pace as I again focused on running through it. I did  only this time there was no increase in pace. Deep fatigue was setting in and it was now a case of hanging on. The final few miles felt like hard labor. There was a head wind. My pace gradually slowed to 6:00 then 6:10 then 6:20. I was back in that zone – surviving as opposed to competing. I guessed I was on track for 2:33-35 but was almost past caring.

With less than a mile to go I got overtaken by a fast finishing Joel Jameson, a triathlete debuting at the marathon, but caught Michael Hargreaves (who would clock a PR but was clearly paying for a 1:12:30 first half). A spectator called out “you still have good form” which roughly translates to “you’re slowing down but at least still looking good.” And then Old Trafford football stadium, home to Manchester United, and Emirates Old Trafford, home of the Lancashire County Cricket Club (LCCC), came into view.

That final mile, a long straight ending right outside the LCCC, seemed to take a little longer, actually a lot longer, than forever. Eventually I passed under the finishing gantry with the clock reading 2:32:02. I was very happy, at least as happy as you can be after a marathon which leaves you so completely exhausted that there’s little if any energy left to celebrate with. Steve, pictured gallery here, went even better clocking 3:11:56, several minutes inside his previous best.

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The end is nigh.

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Steve approaching the finish line.

Race Analysis

I finished 14th of the 9,500 starters, the fastest M35 upwards. My time placed me top of the UK 2016 M50 marathon rankings, just seconds shy of the leading time from 2015 of 2:31:56 by Graham Green. Manchester put on a great show – super fast course, enthusiastic spectators, relaxed atmosphere and even dry weather. Unfortunately there were baggage issues leaving some disgruntled.

Here’s the official review, race video, my official race picturesmy official results, the Garmin data (missing segment near mile 16 of 0.2-3 miles and forgot to stop the watch at the finish line), and Strava data (again missing segment but edited out the failure to stop the watch). My heart was unusually high in the first 10 miles but then moderated.

This is my last marathon. At least it might be. Somehow I need to trump Manchester. But maybe I’ll wait until Donald is behind us all. Either way I’ve ticked off one of my 2016 goals. Steve (pictures here) meanwhile said “there’s unfinished business”: he’ll likely aim to go sub-3 hours in 2017.

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Replacing calories and discussing with brother Steve what went right and wrong.

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Work-Life-Run Balance

by Paul Thompson

Today I ran 20 miles. It started out easy but easy became steady and steady became quite fast. Such is the way with many of my long ‘easy’ runs in Central Park with team mates and mates from rival team Urban Athletics. There’s nothing planned or intentional about the steady increase in pace: it seems the more we chat the faster it gets. And those that know me well know that I can chat as well, if not better, than I can run.

That 20 helped me notch up 70 miles for the week, the second week of my 12 week program through to my April marathon. Coach Lee Troop, whom I introduced in my recent post, promises the real work starts tomorrow. But it took some work to get through last week, not least as I had a challenge balancing work and running.

So what did that last week look like? Well it started on the evening of Friday, January 22nd. New Yorkers will recall that was the night the snow started to fall. At 10pm I was on board a Etihad Airways operated SriLankan Airlines flight using a Jet Airways plane – that’s what airlines call code sharing. As it taxied on the runway at JFK snow was starting to fall. This was the Great Escape. As New York hunkered down for what turned out to be an epic snow storm I was flying to Sri Lanka for a work assignment.

My 22 hour gate to gate journey coupled with moving the clocks forward 10.5 hours meant I spent the whole of Saturday in the air or in an airport (in Abu Dhabi I changed planes). My Sri Lankan Airlines flight touched down in Colombo at 5am Sunday, January 24th. By 6am I was checking in at the Cinnamon Lakeside.

At check-in I was advised my room would not be ready until 8am. If I wanted immediate occupancy I would have to pay for one additional night. This proved a crucial decision point. I opted to wait but inquired whether they had a place I could change. Fifteen minutes later I was in shorts and t-shirt heading out into a city yet to see day break.

I had a good sense of where to run. I’d been to Colombo on two previous occasions, had Googled the city’s running options and had studied a city map. I headed to Galle Face Green on the waterfront. I logged ten miles and saw the day break over the city. I also got to run past the hotel Sham and I stayed at when brother got married in Sri Lanka, back in late December 2001 – the Galle Face Hotel. My run took in the fort area. When I was last in Colombo in 2010, soon after the civil war had ended, the fort was a militarized zone.

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Galle Face Hotel, Colombo

When I got back to the hotel I was hot and sweaty but content. I was also quite a sight, at least for non-runners. As tourists, largely from China, milled around I realized nipple rash had left its tell tale signs on my white tee shirt. Soon after 8am I was all scrubbed up, wearing shorts, and having breakfast at the poolside. There’s nothing like a long relaxing breakfast especially one you figure you’d earned. Run and breakfast done, barely 5 hours after touch down. And it was not yet Sunday in New York, almost half a day in arrears.

Throughout my four night stay I repeated the routine with jet lag the main driver. Typically I was slowing down around 5pm, asleep by 8pm, awake at 4am, running at 5am and breakfasting at 7am. Each day I covered 8-10 miles. I covered pretty much the same  ground each day except one day when I ventured to Viharamahadevi Park (Sri Lanka really challenges your spelling ability). Often times I was joined at breakfast by a crow, sometimes a flock. And on two mornings I was also an ‘extra’ in a wedding photo shoot.

 

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Crows join me for breakfast, the one behind a ten foot high tree

My flight home was at 4am Thursday. I’d run 8 miles Wednesday morning and toured the city in the afternoon. The highlight of the tour, which more than made up for the fact 75% of the time was spent stuck in traffic, was Gangaramaya Temple.

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Buddha at Gangaramaya Temple

In the early evening it was time for a family reunion. I met with a cousin of my wife, Keyan, who lives in Colombo but whose home village, like Sham’s grandparents, is Siruppiddy near Jaffna, a city in the north of the island. Keyan shared the coordinates of Sham’s paternal grandparent’s family home. One day we hope to go there for a full family reunion.

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Family reunion with Sham’s cousin Keyan

At midnight I ventured to the airport. On the return trip I flew Qatar Airways changing planes at their Doha hub, Hamad International. This airport is truly amazing, in stark contrast to the shabby New York airports. By 4pm Thursday, 27 hours after departing the hotel, I was unlocking my front door in Peekskill. Rather than settle down and sleep I decided on a short run. This would ensure I was still awake when Sham got home from work.

Back in New York I rounded out the week with 9 miles on Friday morning and that 20 miles on Saturday. As I finish writing this I am tired but satisfied with my 70 mile week despite 40 plus hours of flying. And despite the humidity I’m also glad I got to run in 30s C weather rather than ploughing through snow in 30s F here in New York. It helped ease the work-life-run balance.