Tag Archives: NYRR

Race Report: UAE Healthy Kidney 10K, New York, April 9, 2017

by Paul Thompson (photos by Shamala Thompson)

Today was a test. To see whether my hamstring tendinitis was in check and whether I’d maintained my fitness despite abstinence from long runs and workouts the past four weeks. I think I passed with flying colors. The acid test will of course be how the legs feel when I wake up tomorrow. But from where I’m comfortably sitting it’s looking hopeful.

The London Marathon is two weeks today. When coach Lee Troop talked me into it back in early January I set my mind on a 2:30 ‘stretch’ goal. By late February I was on track. As indeed were my arch rivals Graham Green, Rob Downs and others. But then I felt a small pain in the butt, both literal and metaphorical. I self diagnosed hamstring tendinitis. I could feel it before the Washington Heights 5K and even more afterwards.

Since then I’ve been traveling a lot for work, city hopping across Europe. I’ve got the miles in but on Troop’s sound advice steered clear of 2 hour plus runs and workouts. Strengthening and stretching got squeezed out by a heavy work load and work socializing in the evenings. And I failed to find suitable physios and the like while away to help me rehabilitate. On arrival back in New York I sought out emergency treatment from Russell Stram (acupuncture) and John Henwood (deep tissue massage). The body responded well.

And so here I was. On the start line of the UAE Healthy Kidney 10K. I last raced this some years back. In 2007, I ran 31:35, my fastest ever 10K as a masters runner. But I lost interest in the race when it fell off the team points schedule. It’s now back on the roster. As well as a test for me, it was crucial for Urban Athletics to follow up its great performance at the Washington Heights 5K  and put in a good showing.

At the starting line

Conditions were near perfect. Temperatures around 55 F, bright sun and slight wind. The only thing standing in the way of fast times was Central Park’s roller coaster course which included the counter clockwise traverse of the northern hills. I quickly got into my running but not as quick as Jason Lakritz UA’s fastest runner. My legs felt rested, the hamstring barely noticeable. I passed one mile in 5:10 with team mates Javier Rodriguez, Carlo Agostinetto, and Jamie Brisbois in close company. John Henwood was just behind.

UA runners led by Jason Lakritz get off to a strong start

Javier was somewhat nervous as he was 10 seconds up on his target pace of 5:20, good for a PR around 33. I was just intent on chasing the first American lady. Natosha Rogers has pedigree and I suspected would hold a good even pace throughout. And she did. I broadly tracked her. During the race one (male) runner after another pulled alongside and one by one she got away from them. The same fate would befall Javier and I.

Javier and I passed 2 miles in 10:20. We then descended to Harlem Meer before negotiating the imposing 600 meter climb of the northern hill, the hardest climb in either direction of Central Park. Javier and Natosha started to edge away from me. I passed 3 miles in 16:05 and 5K in 16:19, 17 seconds faster than Washington Heights 5K.

Javier ahead of Paul in the 5th mile

By now it was clear that the hamstring would not scupper my race, that my legs and lungs were ready for some serious punishment. The fourth mile was possibly the hardest with a significant net gain and undulating roadway throughout. I failed to see the 4 miler marker but extrapolating from my Garmin 235 it was around 21:30. Into the fifth mile I realized there was gas in the tank and plenty of runners just ahead to chase. So I chased.

Time to get serious

By the 8K / 5 mile mark, passed in 26:18 / 26:28, I was back on terms with Javier and Natosha. We had momentum and edged past Phillip Falk of Central Park Track Club, Ned Booth of North Brooklyn Runners and Maclean O’donnell (16:04 in the Washington Heights 5K) of Dashing Whippets Track Club.

I now started to put the hammer down. When I do, few can match my momentum in the final mile. Natosha was one of those few. We gapped Javier then traded strides before she out kicked me in the finishing straight. One of the most tenacious runners I’ve raced. She did not yield an inch and then took a few yards.

My finishing time of 32:44 was good for 30th overall and 1st masters. It was my fastest 10K since April 2011. The age grade of 92.57% AG was one of my best ever after 2015’s Bronx 10 Mile and Grete’s Great Gallop 13.1 and 2007’s Cherry Blossom 10 Mile. Here’s my Garmin stats.

Natosha’s time was 32:46, slower than me due either to my starting a few meters behind or else NYRR messing up the results (again). Natosha was runner up in the 2012 US Olympic Trials for 10000m but did not get to London as she failed to get the A qualifying time. In 2013, she flirted with retirement. Imagine at half my age!

Javier logged 32:48, smashing his PR. Beating Henwood secured 1st M40-44 and 2nd masters overall. Jason Lakritz was first UA runner in 31:53 (19th overall, 5th M25-29). Other individual top 10 UA placings were: James Brisbois 33:41, 7th M20-24; Carlo Agostinetto 33:47, 5th M35-39; Matt Chaston 34:24, 1st M45-49; Stefano Piana-Agostinetto 36:27, 7th M45-49; Peter Heimgartner 37:29, 10th M45-49; Jonathan Schindel 37:28, 2nd M50-54; Fiona Bayly 37:57, 1st women’s masters and 1st W45-49; Adam Kuklinski 38:39, 5th M50-54; Ellen Basile 40:16, 2nd W40-44; Jennifer Harvey 43:06, 4th W45-49; Kieran Sikso 44:57, 5th W40-44; and Kaori Takai 47:57, 9th W45-49.

Jason in the finishing straight

Like Washington Heights this was a big day for UA team placings. UA were 3rd open team (Jason, me, Javier, James and Carlo) behind West Side and NYAC if you ‘discount’ the NIKE elite team. UA were also 4th open women’s team (Fiona, Ellen, Jennifer, Kieran and Kaori), 1st men’s masters (me, Javier and Matt Chaston), 1st women’s masters (Fiona, Ellen and Jennifer), and 1st men’s M50 (me, Jonathan and Adam).

Fiona Bayly storming to 1st place masters

In the overall standings both the men’s and women’s were close run affairs. In the men’s race, Sam Chelanga of the United States won in a sprint finish over Thomas Longosiwa of Kenya, with both men timed in 28:21.  The women’s race saw Mamitu Daska of Ethiopia beat Magdalene Masai of Kenya, 31:37 to 31:44. Natosha Rogers of the United States was seventh in 32:46. The course records of 27:35 and 30:44 survived.

Leaders in the 5th mile with the 1st and 2nd place runners at front

So it seems I passed the test.  London is calling  The M50 field is loaded – top 3 Brits in 2017 half marathon rankings Graham Green (1:13:20), Rob Downs (1:14:02) and Nigel Rackham (1:14:14: I was watching this in Reading nursing hamstring) against Martin Fiz, former World Marathon Champion and 2:31 in tough Boston race in 2016. A Spanish Galleon verses some British frigates.

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Race Report: NYRR Retro 4-Miler, Central Park, New York, June 5, 2016

by Paul Thompson

It dawned on me today, as I lined up and observed the retro paraphernalia – the sweat bands, psychedelic colors, the mini shorts etc. – that I actually experienced much of the retro era. For many it was something they’d read about like  a history lesson. For me, and other masters runners, it was something we’d lived through. And for a moment it made me feel sentimental and old!

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This race fell on Sham and my anniversary. At 6 am, in pouring rain, she was driving us (or was it me?) to New York. It’s amazing sometimes what our partners, consciously, do for us.

After Sham had set me down at Marcus Garvey Park I ran the 3 miles or so south down to the start on the East Drive at 68th Street. As I reached the Boathouse I saw Urban Athletics team mates headed north for a warm-up. I was already warmed up – the  weather was as humid as a sauna though not so hot – but jumped in. This would be my first time running for Urban Athletics (UA) – in the US at least as I’d premiered in the Greater Manchester Marathon. This was also my first race since Manchester in early April. I’d finished that marathon with a chronic calf strain: question was would it re-emerge?

On the start line I was some way back from my usual position near the front. As

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Retro lead car at the start line

well as hearing a rendition of the National Anthem we also heard a tribute to The Greatest. Muhammad Ali passed away yesterday. As I get older I’m finding that not only have I lived through eras like retro, I’ve also lived during the lifetimes of iconic figures who have had a profound positive impact on our lives. Bowie now Ali.They show us what’s possible.

Right back to the race. Within seconds of the starting gun I found myself passing the Boathouse dodging traffic thanks to starting deep in the A corral. Club mate Javier Rodriguez ‘s rationale for starting deep was that it would moderate the early pace and help ensure we run 5:15 miles and finish  in 21:00. But I found myself panicked into trying to make up for lost time and get into my finishing position! The net result was a 5:07 opening mile, a mile that takes in Cat Hill. Too fast. I’d pay for that later.

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Heading up Cat Hill

In the second mile fellow masters runners Javier, who had never beaten me at distances over  a mile, and John Henwood, who  I don’t recall  I’d  ever beat, joined me. We’d end  up duking it out for the rest of the race: another masters runner, Peter Brady, was also in hot pursuit. We traded strides, sparring running style. We passed the two mile mark in 10:19 making it a 5:12 second mile.

Bobby Asher, who looked like Freddie Mercury but was  hoping for Mark Spitz, breezed passed us during the third mile as we navigated the hills on the West Drive heading south. Fellow UA club mate Jason Lakritz, nursing an injury, caught us. Approaching mile 3 we had Greg Cass in our sights and he’d stay there. During the third mile I found myself starting to pay for the fast opening. We passed mile 3 in 15:47: the 3rd mile had taken 5:28, the slowest of the race due in large part to the hills and fast opening.

The final mile drops down to the 72nd Street Transverse. Javier started to open it up and stole a small gap on me. John had dropped off. As we took the sharp left hand turn into the finishing straight I was 5 meters shy of Javier but I appeared to be catching him. I didn’t despite a 5:14 final mile. Bobby, Javier, myself and Jason finished in that order, and with daylight between us, but shared the same time of 21:01 in the official results.

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Jason, Javier and Paul heading to the finish line

I  had hoped to get under 21:00 not least since I’d tapered and had been doing some faster workouts with UA. But hey I can’t, or shouldn’t, complain. I got 31st overall (though I  was 30th over the line but that’s chip to chip timing for you), second masters, first M50 and best age grade with 91.08%. This suggested I had recovered from my spring marathon ordeal though my AG scores indicated I was better at longer races. UA got 4th in men’s open: The NYRR race report reveals WSX winning with its 5th scorer running 19 flat. With Aaron Mendelsohn closing in 21:24, and like Javier getting a PR, we comfortably won the men’s masters.  My Garmin race stats are here.

After driving home and getting a quick shower, Sham and I  were holed up at the Taco Dive Bar having a celebratory brunch. Sham had a potent cocktail with her breakfast burrito while I had water paired with a stack of pancakes inches deep. A few hours later I was at JFK. There I had a  frustrating 4 hour wait on the runway waiting for my plane to Las Vegas to depart due to foul weather. I’m now getting accustomed to a few days in 110F.  This morning I got out at 6 to beat the heat. I ran an easy 6. It was 85F.

Race Report: 2016 Gridiron 4M, New York, February 7, 2016

by Paul Thompson

Today was my first race as a M50. It was also the first time ever, or at least as far as I can remember, that I was on the start line having not adjusted my training in preparation for a race. Quite the reverse. I did a long easy, or as easy as I could make it, 18 miles the day before. And it was the first time I completed a race having wished New York Road Runners (NYRR) operated a double dipping awards program. I’ll come back to that later.

This race was not on my bucket list for 2016. The USATF Cross Country Championships in Bend, Oregon (the M50 title I coveted was won by Carl Combs) was but the logistics – 5 hour flight then 3 hour drive – together with flight and hotel costs ruled that out. So with Bend out of the reckoning I had no viable excuse when team mate Carlo Agostinetto started press ganging his Warren Street team mates into running this race in the hope of picking up some team prize money. His methods proved very effective. Pretty much the entire racing team towed the line having gone to great lengths, and no doubt great ‘cost’, to get ‘leave’ from partners.

I explained to coach Lee Troop that I’d like to do this one “for the team”. He said OK. But there was a catch. First he suggested I make it part of a long run but eventually he settled on my running at least 1:45 the day before. In the early miles I thought about not racing but imagined Carlo’s disappointment so I focused on putting as much easy into that long easy run as I could and worked on managing expectations. My slowest time for 4 miles in the part was 21:11 on a hot September’s day back in 2014. A personal worst was on the cards.

I rode the train in to Harlem 125th Street from Peekskill. My driver, manager, cheer leader, bag carrier and photographer (hence no pictures for this post except for MarathonFoto!) wife Sham was in Singapore with family seeing in the Lunar New Year following a work trip to Bangkok. I then ran over to the Upper West Side to drop my bag and collect team mate Aaron Mendelsohn. We ran to the start picking up team mates en route.

The weather was near perfect. Still, bright sunshine and a few degrees above freezing, quite unusual for early February in these parts. Standing waiting in the starting corral for the gun I tried to seek some place in the sun. I only had a vest, shorts and gloves. And then we were off.

My new Garmin got to tell the story and passed it onto Strava. Three runners stole a big lead within the first quarter of a mile. Meanwhile team mates Carlo and Sebastien Baret and I chased 4th and 5th placed Bobby Asher and Tesfaye Girma. We caught them during the undulating first mile heading south down the West Side Drive. I passed mile one with Carlo in 5:21. We traded places – we may be team mates but we typically compete hard against each other – in the gently descending second mile. We passed the second mile marker in 10:34.

As we crested the high point of the 72nd Street Transverse I opted for the Denver Broncos channel owing to my liking for Boulder (for those that did not run please see the NYRR race report for an explanation). As did Carlo. And as we ascended Cat Hill Carlo started to edge away. I was running strong but I had no gears or speed to respond with. I covered the third mile in 5:29 and Carlo stole 5 seconds. He went on to rob me of another 4 seconds by the finish line. He posted 21:15, close to a PR, while I breasted the tape in 21:24, a PW.

In the finishing channel Carlo and I waited for the team. They all followed in quick succession – Sebastien Baret (21:38), Fabio Casadio (22:20), Aaron Mendelsohn (22:23) and Alex Lorton (22:37). All six of us either won our age group or else were in the top 5. But more importantly we were top team and NYRR owed us $500.

Now back to the double dipping. Were NYRR to permit double dipping my net worth (can’t you tell I’m an accountant) would have increased $425 ($100 for 5th overall, $150 for 1st 40+, $75 for 1st M50 AG and $100 for my share of the $500 team prize) in 21 minutes. That’s a great hourly rate. Unfortunately NYRR applies the following rule: “Unless otherwise noted, runners with multiple eligibility will be awarded the highest prize money amount only.” So I’ll have to settle for $250 – or $150 as likely the whole team will get to blow the $500 on beer.

The big consolation of the day, after a warm down, was being treated to a slice of chocolate brioche by Aaron and his fiancee Aviva. We might spend our $500 on these.

 

Race Report: NYRR Ted Corbitt 15K, New York, December 12, 2015

by Paul Thompson

In the penultimate race of 2015, and of my 40s, I fell just shy of my goal of 50 minutes. Spring had come to New York and many of us were able to make hay. The race also marked the end of the NYRR season-long club points championship and Warren Street managed to end on a high with 3rd in the open men’s race and 2nd in the men’s masters. That was enough in the final reckoning of the 2015 season overall, to finish 4th in the open men’s competition and 3rd in the men’s masters (assuming my math holds water). We’ll take that.

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Runners heading towards the starting area

While I may have had a lofty target of 50 minutes I had little idea how fit I was. In my two previous races – Bronx 10 and Grete’s Half Marathon in back to back weeks in early fall – I’d hit a real high with highest ever age grade (AG) performances (us masters runners rarely get in the mix at the sharp end so AG is a nice consolation). But in the 4 week period ending November 23rd I’d logged 120 hours of flying. And I’m not a pilot.

The business travel took me to Seoul, Geneva, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur (twice!). While I enjoy traveling, and seeing new places like Seoul which was a pleasant surprise for running (see here for a sample run in Strava), my running routine that hangs around long runs and repetition workouts got bent out of shape. But somehow I got in 70 mile weeks. In a future article I’ll share how with the help of expert time management!

Lining up in the front corral it was clear that West Side Runners (WSX) and New York Athletic Club (NYAC) would be duking this one out for the top team (see the NYRR race report here). Barely 400 meters into the race I found myself in the mid teens with 5 or so runners from each of these teams ahead of me. I passed the first mile in around 5:20, the second in 10:40, and then settled into 5:25-30 miles.

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With the Warren Street men at the start

For most of the race I found myself isolated. From 2 through 5 miles I traded strides and places with someone new to the local running scene who I was unfamiliar. Passing  the 5 mile mark in 27:02, I got a gap on this guy and found myself running alone until John Davies of NYAC breezed passed in the 7th mile. John quickly opened up a gap on me. It was a timely kick up the backside as one often needs three quarters into a race when one is prone to losing concentration.

In the closing stages I could see a sub-50, equivalent to my Bronx 10 performance albeit that was on a flatter course (this one took in the middle 4 mile loop and the bottom 5 mile loop, missing the northern hills but still taking in Cat Hill twice) was off the charts so I reconciled on running 50:30. Which I did with 5 seconds in hand.

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Heading to the five mile mark

My 50:25 was good 10th overall, 1st place masters and top AG of 92.04 (once NYRR have corrected for 9th place  Michele Giangaspro, a 47 year old 23 minute 5K runner who posted 3 PRs back to back). I got to hang out in the finishers area to see team mates finish – Carlo Agostinetto (2nd M35-39 and a PR in 51:25), Sebastien Baret (3rd M35-39 in 52:03), Danny Tateo (1st M50 in 55:37), Alex Lorton (final scorer in 5 man open team with 55:48), Antonio Nebres (2nd man in 3 man masters team with 56:59) and Fabio Casadio (57:21).

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Sebatian B. looking good at five miles.

So with December 28 closing in fast I now have one race left as a M40-49 runner – next Saturday’s 2015 USATF New York 10 km Championships in Central Park, a place that is my second home. I will soon reach my goal of 50 – years rather than minutes.

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Race Report: NYRR Retro 4-Miler, Central Park, New York, June 7, 2015

by Paul Thompson

In my last post I rounded off by saying how important it was to be the hard to please type. And so it was today. As I warmed up – running the 4 miles from Marcus Garvey Park in Central Harlem after Sham had driven us in –  I fixed my goal finish time of sub-21:00 in my mind. So you’d think that my 20:55 finish time would have made me happy as Larry. But it didn’t.

Race conditions were ideal. A gentle breeze, bright sunshine and temperatures hovering around 60F. My warm-up, a repeat of what I did for the Scotland Run 10K, suggested my legs were well rested after a tough few weeks in mid-May. The only cloud fogging my mind was my ongoing IT band ‘issue’ which for the last few months appeared to have triggered some ankle swelling. The fat ankle had prompted me to visit Dr Stu on Friday and he’d worked his usual magic.

Many runners were decked out in club colors from yesteryear in keeping with the retro race theme. Some Warren Street team mates did the same but also in honor of our recently departed all time best runner Pat Petersen. Runners respected a moment’s silence in his memory. Pat died at just 55. He was a former U.S. marathon record holder and top 5 at three New York City marathons. I never had the privilege of meeting Pat but somehow feel like I did. He set a very high bar as a husband, father and runner.

Thinking of Pat – how he so completely dedicated himself to running, how he achieved so much, and yet how he was in all other ways just a regular kinda guy, husband and father with no airs and graces – it seems he lived my favorite Tibetan proverb “better to live for one day as a tiger than to live for a thousand years as a sheep”. To honor Pat the only way a runner can meant I had to hurt today.

I started out much slower than the last time I did the last time I raced this 4 mile course. I buried myself deep in the pack and passed the mile mark in 5:12. Matt Chaston, perhaps the New York area’s fastest runner over 5K to 5 miles for M45-49 , was almost 10 seconds ahead of me. I hoped I could reel him in during the hills in the third mile. Matt, born in Wales but New York resident for many years, comes from great running stock. His brother Justin, also Stateside living in Colorado Springs, ran for Great Britain in 3 consecutive Olympics.

I tracked a group dominated by Central Park Track Club (CPTC) runners. They passed 2 miles in 10:20 and had been closing on Matt. I was working hard, too hard. That proved to be my downfall. As we turned left off the 102nd Transverse onto the East Side Drive and started the gentle climb towards the third mile mark I started to drop off the group. At mile three the clock read 15:45. In the final mile the course gently descends. This saved me from unravelling further.

As I straightened up after taking the final turn – a 270 degree left hander – I saw the clock reading 20 something and sub-21:00. I dug deep and the body responded. I crossed the line in 20:55. Matt was 9 seconds ahead of me. He’d only previously beaten me once before – in the Central Park Conservancy Run for Central Park in July 2011 run on the same 4 mile course.

So I finished in 20:55 for 26th overall and 2nd M45-49. There was some consolation in gaining the top age grade of 91.40%. Warren Street’s masters team finished second to CPTC. Danny Tateo was 1st M50-54 in 22:28, 40 seconds ahead of his nearest challenger. Our masters team are still just ahead of CPTC in the year to date rankings but 2015 promises to be battle that will go to the wire. Sam Lynch, 7th overall in 19:23,  led us to 4th place open team.

Race Report: Scotland Run (10K), New York, April 4, 2015

by Paul Thompson

After a training stint the previous weekend in Boulder, Colorado with teammate Carlo Agostinetto and Dr. Stuart Weitzman working his magic on the IT band I had high expectations for this year’s Scotland Run. My target was 32 and change, even if the change was 59 seconds. As I ran down the west side of the park as part of my 4 mile warm-up, Shamala having dropped me off at Marcus Garvey Park in South Harlem, I saw rival Hector Rivera. Hector and I ran the exact same race in  2005 and this time the same few seconds would separate us at the finish.

My NYRR race results history reveals I’ve done this race almost every year since I started competing in NYRR races in early 2005. I ran it for the first time in IMG_2750April 2005, my third ever race in the city, barely 6 months after Sham and I moved here from South East Asia in October 2004.  Being British I feel connected with it, more than any other NYRR race. The bagpiping boosts the adrenalin. Just before the start they piped ‘Flower of Scotland’, the national anthem.

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I was back in the front corral, after a several months long hiatus, sporting a two digit race tag, 52 (more on that later). I was barely ten seconds behind the leaders at the mile mark. The clock showed 4:57. Either I’d gone out too fast – I needed to average 5:19 minutes per mile to get under 33 minutes – or NYRR had misplaced the mile markers. At mile 2 the clock showed 10:30 suggesting no irrational exuberance on my part.

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Paul at the first mile with Bobby Asher, Matthew Lacey and Roberto Puente in front and Hector Rivera in hot pursuit

The northern hills and buffeting winds, coming at you from all directions, took their toll. I passed the 3 mile marker in 15:40 and 5K in around 16:15, faster than my finish time at the Washington Heights 5K. I was trading places with Bobby Asher, Hector Rivera and Matthew Lacey. The  clock at 4 miles showed 21:20 – NYRR’s mile markers appeared back on track – and at 5 miles 26:20. 32 something was on the cards.

In the closing mile or so Hector, Bobby and Matthew started to pull away from me. And then Oz Pearlman glided by. As the finish line came into view I could see 32:4.. But as I stepped onto the finishers mat I could see 33:0.. So near yet so far. Yet I was happy with that. My 33:02 was 3 seconds faster than my 2014 result. It secured me 22nd overall, 1st M45-49, 2nd masters overall to Hector and top male age grade with 92.23%. It was deja vu for Hector and I – he was the same 10 seconds or so ahead of me as he was in 2005 though age had slowed us both.

Overall the Warren Street team did well. At the time of initially posting this story the website results excluded someone with my no. 52 tag appearing in the live tracking. Now that NYRR have corrected the results the team are showing 4th and 1st respectively in the open and masters mens divisions. Sam Lynch led the team home in 4th in 31:05, Max Hyams (M1-19) and Danny Tateo (M50-54) won their respective divisions, and Carlo bagged a PR of 34:15. More race pictures are here thanks to Steven Waldon.

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Sam Lynch (38) battling with NYAC’s leading trio

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Danny Tateo (764) tracked by teammate Fabio Casadio (202)

Race Report: Washington Heights Salsa, Blues, and Shamrocks 5K, New York, March 1, 2015

by Paul Thompson

In my last race, a cross country race in Boulder CO., I got sunburnt and almost complained of it being too hot. Today it was right back to reality. The sun didn’t show up and I joined the cacophony of runners complaining aybout the cold. But at least we got some warmth care of the sights and sounds of Washington Heights.

Like last year I rode the train to Harlem-125th Street Metro North station and from there ran the 3.5 miles to the starting area. I then added a few more miles of warm-up with clubmate Danny Tateo, a newly minted 50 year-old who looks more 25 at a glance and who had a shot at first M50-54.

This race starts with a long progressive climb in the first mile – a bit like a ski jump with a steeper incline near the top. Unlike last year there was no photographer blocking our way at 50 metres in so we were saved the mass pile up of 2014. I got to the one mile mark in a shade under 5:20, some 13 seconds behind last year’s split.

I hoped to claw back some seconds in the second mile, looping around Fort Tyron Park, and get back on target to match last year’s 16:10 time. But passing the band clambering up the incline towards the mile two mark, appropriately playing a “A Hard Day’s Night” (they seem to every year as I pass ’em), I was sensing I had not accelerated in the second mile. And sure enough I had not. The clock at mile two showed 10:40. For the last mile, essentially the first mile in reverse and as such a long descent, I tried to stay in contact with Bobby Asher of VCTC but he stole two seconds from me as I closed in 16:29.

I was a bit dismayed to be 19 seconds off 2014. But I was first masters. In the finishing area I caught up with team mates: Warren Street had finished 5th men’s open and 1st men’s masters.  A great start to the year. And something for the team to savor over food and drinks at Thursday’s NYRR Club Night. And for me a great end to a week in which I learned at my annual medical check that my ‘body age’ was 29.

As I warmed down, with Antony Scott and Carlo Agostinetto,  I reflected on what a weird but wonderful crowd runners are. Who in their right minds would be out running, let alone racing, on a bitterly cold Sunday morning. Over 5,700 New Yorkers did just that today.  NYRR’s full report and pictures are here.