Tag Archives: Training

Race Report: Washington Heights Salsa, Blues, and Shamrocks 5K, New York, March 5, 2017

by Paul Thompson (pictures by Shamala Thompson)

Today was possibly the coldest conditions I’ve ever run in. Leaving the house to drive south at 7:15am, my weather app was showing 12F (-11C), feeling like 2F (-18C). The bright sunshine was deceptive. It promised some warmth but gave none. Fortunately Urban Athletics came away with a truck load of team and individual awards, topped by first woman, enough to make it more than worth braving the cold. While some members were running in new, older, age groups, all of us felt like we were running in a new Ice Age.

When I first said to coach ‘Troopy’ that I wanted to run this for the team he suggested I run train through and not allow it to interfere with my London Marathon preparations. That’s what I did when racing the 2016 Gridiron 4M last February while building for the Greater Manchester Marathon. I’m not big on ‘training through’. I like to think I can give every race a fair shot. So I was relieved that  Troopy changed his mind. After hill repeats on Monday and 14 miles on Tuesday, he then adjusted my training to allow some tapering. I ended the week, Saturday, with 62 miles, almost 20 less than the previous week. And on Fridayt I saw DrStu who treated tightness where the glute meets the hamstring.

After parking the car at Marcus Garvey Park, Sham and I ran the 3.5 miles to the start via St. Nicholas Avenue. It was a warm-up of sorts. We arrived with barely 10 minutes to go, just enough time to squeeze in a few strides and ‘relieve’ myself behind the locked toilet block. Huddling with UA team mates in the starting corral offered some collective warmth but some face muscles were not working making for slurred conversation. It was a relief to hear the gun. Only 16 minutes until I got reunited with my warm clothing.

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Jason Lakritz, leading UA finisher

On the opening half mile climb I tucked into a group comprising team mates Javier Rodriguez, Carlo Agostinetto and Jamie Brisbois. Jason Lakritz was in a group several meters ahead of us. Several other masters runners were in close proximity including Peter Brady and John Henwood. Gradually Carlo and Javier edged away with John on their coat tails. I covered the first mile in 5:21.

The course then descends for some 500 meters into Fort Tyron Park. I was now chasing John. Carlo and Javier had gotten away. As we circled the Cloisters and started to head home – this 5K is an out and back with the Cloisters marking the lowest point of the undulating course – for the first time I can remember I snatched a view of the Hudson River.

The second mile is symmetrical – it descends for 500 meters, circles the Cloisters for 600 meters and then winds its way back up for 500 meters. I passed mile 2, the highest point of the course, in 10:43. At this point one is tempted to think one can cruise down to the finish. That’s a mistake. There’s still a steady 300 meter climb to tackle before the course drops down to the finish.  At the crest of that climb I pulled alongside John only to have him accelerate away.

In that final 800 meters of gently descending roadway I lost a few places and crossed the finish line in 16:36 per the official results, good for 33rd overall. It was a few seconds shy of my 16:30 target. My Garmin data is here but it’s mixed with my long warm-up.

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Crossing the finish line in 16:36

Javier won the masters in 16:09, John in 2nd in 16:31 and me 3rd, 1st M50 and top AG with 89.63%. UA won big. Harriott Kelly won the women’s race in 17:16 and Fiona Bayly, just shy of her 50th birthday, matched Javier by winning the women’s masters in 19:06. UA won the team races for masters men, masters women and veteran men (M50) and came 3rd overall for men and 5th overall for women.

Harriott was gushing with joy, pride and relief. Typically understated and super modest for a short while she wanted, quite rightly, to remind everyone “I won” and get the plaudits. That feeling I could tell she had was that priceless feeling that comes when all the hard work and commitment pays big dividends and you come out on top. Well done Harriott!

Other UA individual top 10 age group placers were as follows: Jason Lakritz 9th overall and 5th M25-29 in 15:46; Carlo Agostinetto 1st M35-39 in 16:10; James Brisbois 2nd M20-24 in 16:55; Matt Chaston 2nd M45-49 in 16:59; Aaron Mendelsohn 6th M40-44 in 17:06; Stefano Piana-Agostinetti 7th M45-49 in 17:47; Jonathan Schindel 3rd  M50-54 in 17:54; Theo Dassin 2nd M15-19 in 17:57; Adam Kuklinski 4th M50-54 in 18:44; Ellen Basile 2nd W40-44 in 19:25; Paul Wong 10th M50-54 in 19:32; Jennifer Harvey 3rd W45-49 in 20:17; Dominique Saint-Louis 1st W50-54 in 20:27; and Isobel Porteous 4th W15-19 in 23:53.

The NYRR race report, which runs a close second to this one, plus pictures are here and the full results, the format of which I’m still trying to master (!), are here.

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From left to right: Jacob Salant, me, Aaron Mendelsohn, Jamie Brisbois, Javier Rodriguez, Carlo Agostinetto, Jason Lakritz, Stefano Piana-Agostinetti, and Harriott Kelly

I won’t calculate the average age of our placers. Suffice to say we are working hard to lower it! Meantime our mature runners are the best in the New York area and look amazing.

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Preparing for London and Avoiding Fake Injuries

by Paul Thompson

Back in January I was in Boulder CO.. I was there to plan and kick start my 2017 campaign. I landed at Denver International Airport (DIA) late morning. It was snowing, there was a 13 -inch deep carpet of snow and it was -17C. I arrived, as I explained a few weeks before, unsure whether to run any marathon in ’17, let alone which one, and when. After 10 minutes with coach Lee Troop I was doing London on April 23. It speaks volumes for Troopy’s power of persuasion and my belief in him. It was 14 January, 14 weeks to London.

Flatirons, Boulder under blanket of snow

It’s now eight weeks to London. Yesterday I closed out an 80 mile week with an easy 23 miles in Central Park. It was almost 70F, the sun was out, I was running (and talking!) with Urban Athletics team mates and Mike McManus, and I was injury free. Life is good. Let’s hope it stays like that.

On January 14,  Troopy said if I was to run a marathon in ’17 better it be a big occasion one. I ran 2:32:02 in ’16 at the super fast Greater Manchester and they were keen to have me back. But London is arguably the world’s greatest marathon and I get to join brother Steve, Jordanian friend Mo’ath Alkhawaldeh, and Troopy’s top charge Laura Thweatt. Some top M50 Brits are also running London, most notably Graham Green. Graham’s currently logging 120 miles a week and like me aiming for 2:30. I hope we can help each other.

In my last post I flagged some potential target races for ’17. Those targets are clearer now. In addition to London, I’ll aim to run the half marathon (and maybe XC) at the European Masters Athletics Non-Stadia Champs in Denmark and run as many of the NYRR club championship races as I can and, in turn, hopefully help Urban Athletics retain the masters’ team title we collected a few days ago at The Hard Rock Cafe, Times Square.

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Urban Athletics award winning masters’ team

At The Hard Rock , Urban Athletics team mates turned out in force and in full voice to support their 12 nominees. We clinched the masters’ team award and six individual awards. I won the M50-54 to add to the one from last year and the 9, of of 10, won while in my forties.

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L to R: Matt Chaston (M45-49 winner), me (M50-54 winner), Carlo Agostinetto (Ultra winner), Jonathan Kline (M55-59 winner), Javier Rodriguez (M40-44 winner) and Aaron Mendelsohn (M40-44 nominee)

In the past few days team mates, in particular project manager Moses Lee and dentist Ramin Talib, have asked how I avert injury. Truth is I’m not immune. Since 2011 I’ve had a constant battle with IT band issues and in early 2013, when I last attempted to train for London, was plagued with sciatica. I’d like to think that I’ve gotten wiser with age. But I’d be kidding myself. Sciatica proved stubborn and only went away when an accident forced me to take 6 weeks off.

My IT band issue is firmly under control thanks to regular visits to DrStu, a Bedford Hills based chiropractor, and a DIY self maintenance routine. My routine focuses on strengthening, rather than stretching, of glutes and hips. It comprises some gluteal exercises (given to me by Heather North when I tripped to Boulder before the Bronx 10 last September), together with some foam rolling and calf raises. The routine is repeated 3-4 times and takes 12-15 minutes on the floor of my lounge while watching some fake news.

In sum my routine looks like this (videos by Heather of her husband Ewen):

1. Glute max – 2 of following for 60 seconds, both sides and repeated: http://youtu.be/96sud2L5jiI


2. Glute med – 2 of following for 60 seconds, both sides and repeated:





3. Foam rolling – light rolling focused on mid-IT band. Note: I do not overdo it as this article cautions: https://breakingmuscle.com/learn/your-it-band-is-not-the-enemy-but-maybe-your-foam-roller-is/

4. Calf raises – 60 seconds, both sides and repeated: http://www.dummies.com/health/exercise/how-to-do-the-standing-calf-raise/

Well that’s all for now. Trump’s back on the TV so it’s time to roll and stop faking it.

 

 

Work-Life-Run Balance

by Paul Thompson

Today I ran 20 miles. It started out easy but easy became steady and steady became quite fast. Such is the way with many of my long ‘easy’ runs in Central Park with team mates and mates from rival team Urban Athletics. There’s nothing planned or intentional about the steady increase in pace: it seems the more we chat the faster it gets. And those that know me well know that I can chat as well, if not better, than I can run.

That 20 helped me notch up 70 miles for the week, the second week of my 12 week program through to my April marathon. Coach Lee Troop, whom I introduced in my recent post, promises the real work starts tomorrow. But it took some work to get through last week, not least as I had a challenge balancing work and running.

So what did that last week look like? Well it started on the evening of Friday, January 22nd. New Yorkers will recall that was the night the snow started to fall. At 10pm I was on board a Etihad Airways operated SriLankan Airlines flight using a Jet Airways plane – that’s what airlines call code sharing. As it taxied on the runway at JFKw was starting to fall. This was the Great Escape. As New York hunkered down for what turned out to be an epic snow storm I was flying to Sri Lanka for a work assignment.

My 22 hour gate to gate journey coupled with moving the clocks forward 10.5 hours meant I spent the whole of Saturday in the air or an airport (in Abu Dhabi I changed planes). My Sri Lankan Airlines flight touched down in Colombo at 5am Sunday, January 24th. by 6am I was checking in at the Cinnamon Lakeside.

At check-in I was advised my room would not be ready until 8am. If I wanted immediate occupancy I would have to pay for one additional night. This proved a crucial decision point. I opted to wait but inquired whether they had a place I could change. Fifteen minutes later I was in shorts and t-shirt heading out into a city yet to see day break.

I had a good sense of where to run. I’d been to Colombo on two previous occasions, had Googled the city’s running options and had studied a city map. I headed to Galle Face Green on the waterfront. I logged ten miles and saw the day break over the city. I also got to run past the hotel Sham and I stayed at when brother got married in Sri Lanka,  back in late December 2001 – the Galle Face Hotel. My run took in the fort area. When I was last in Colombo in 2010, soon after the civil war had ended, the fort was a militarized zone.

Galle Face Hotel

Galle Face Hotel, Colombo

When I got back to the hotel I was hot and sweaty but content. I was also quite a sight, at least for non runners. As tourists, largely from China, milled around I realized nipple rash had left its tell tale signs on my white tee shirt. Soon after 8am I was all scrubbed up, wearing shorts, and having breakfast at the poolside. There’s nothing like a long relaxing breakfast especially one you figure you’d earned. Run and breakfast done, barely 5 hours after touch down. And it was not yet Sunday in New York, almost half a day in arrears.

Throughout my four night stay I repeated the routine with jet lag the driver. Typically I was slowing down around 5pm, asleep by 8pm, awake at 4am, running at 5am and breakfasting at 7am. Each day I covered 8-10 miles. I covered pretty much the same  ground each day except one day when I ventured to Viharamahadevi Park (Sri Lanka really challenges your spelling ability). Often times I was joined at breakfast by a crow, sometimes a flock. And on two mornings I was also an ‘extra’ in wedding photo shoots.

 

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Crows join me for breakfast, the one behind a ten foot high tree

My flight home was at 4am Thursday. I’d run 8 miles Wednesday morning and toured the city in the afternoon. The highlight of the tour, which more than made up for the fact 75% of the time was spent stuck in traffic, was Gangaramaya Temple.

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Buddha at Gangaramaya Temple

In the early evening it was time for a family reunion. I met with a cousin of my wife, Keyan, who lives in Colombo but whose home village, like Sham’s grandparents, is Siruppiddy near Jaffna, a city in the north of the island. Keyan shared the coordinates of Sham’s paternal grandparent’s family home. One day we hope to go there for a full family reunion.

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Family reunion with Sham’s cousin Keyan

At midnight I ventured to the airport. On the return trip I flew Qatar Airways changing planes at their Doha hub, Hamad International. This airport is truly amazing, in stark contrast to the shabby New York airports. By 4pm Thursday, 27 hours after departing the hotel, I was unlocking my front door in Peekskill. Rather than settle down and sleep I decided on a short run. This would ensure I was still awake when Sham got home from work.

Back in New York I rounded out the week with 9 miles on Friday morning and that 20 miles on Saturday. As I finish writing this I am tired but satisfied with my 70 mile week despite 40 plus hours of flying. And despite the humidity I’m also glad I got to run in 30s C weather rather than ploughing through snow in 30s F here in New York. It helped ease the work-life-run balance.

Road to Full Fitness: In the 50s

By Paul Thompson

Last week I logged 55 miles. This was my highest weekly mileage since early February – back then I was racking up almost 80 miles a week building for an assault on my marathon PR. It’s the high watermark of a summer spent largely under water. Significantly the week included two runs – a progressive tempo and a long run – that confirmed I am well on my way back to being fit following several months battling with sciatica and fixing fractures from an accident.

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Battling up a steep incline while on holiday in Dartmouth, UK

It was the sixth week of my comeback campaign. More telling than the mileage was the fact that I actually felt a lot like my old running self. On the tempo I found myself running reasonably quickly. And yet I did not realize it, let alone plan it. It just came – by accident not design. Sure it felt quite hard but my body and mind were complaining less than they had been of late. A few drinks the night before may have numbed the senses.

I have no clear route mapped out to full fitness. Rather a plan is slowly taking shape and evolving organically as time passes and I get fitter. That plan now looks like this. Add an extra 10 miles per week each month. Starting with July at 40 miles per week, August is my 50 miles per week month.The menu of runs is showing some resemblance to my regular diet of the past few years – repetition session, progressive tempo run and long run interspersed with recovery runs.

My first full race will likely be Grete’s Great Gallop half marathon: the exact same race as my last race when I clocked 1:11:15. I may drop in a NYC Runs 5k race in September to get body and mind accustomed again to the routine, pain and, hopefully, jubilation, of racing.

Staying Motivated as Age Sets In

by Paul Thompson

As the days start to shorten I’m reminded that it will soon be fall. Earlier this year when I set my goals for the year I said I’d consider a marathon this fall like Chicago if the stars aligned and my training was going real well around this time. Well I’m in a hole – a black hole. My legs feel beat and I’m running slower than I’d like. So I’ve canned the idea of a fall marathon. Instead I will likely have crack at breaking my PR on a fast course like London in the spring of 2013.

It seems I’m down to the last few grains of sand in the egg timer as far as setting a marathon PR is concerned. At 46 going on 47 (I hear the violins) the chances of my beating 2:29:56 are getting slimmer by the day. So how can I stay motivated enough to keep chalking up 70 mile weeks. Aside from the club races I’m committed to doing I need a big race this fall if I am to stay motivated.

My shortlist is short – the Philadelphia Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon (Philly). Last year I ran 1:10:48 and came 84th (you read it right, eighty fourth!): what does a guy need to do! The winner came in at 58:46. I had a slight handicap – a full day of travel from southern Italy the day before. But that excuse only goes so far.

Matthew Kisorio and Sammy Kitwara, who came in 1st and 2nd, heading to the finish.

Philly is perhaps the best half in the US and possibly the world. In 2011 it witnessed U.S. All Comers records for both men and women. It’s great depth means there’s people to compete with the whole way. And it’s expertly organized under the stewardship of Tracy Sundlun, one of Warren Street’s founders.

Warren Street entered a mixed team at at last year’s Philly half marathon.

These past few weeks I’ve racked up my training to 70 miles per week including 20 mile plus runs and speed endurance workouts. But am I ready to put it on the line and see whether I can dip under 70 minutes. I have little time to decide. Should I stay or should I go?

Boulder to Boston

by Paul Thompson

This past weekend was the first time I’d trained in Boulder with anyone else. Sure Shamala and I often start out together but typically next see each other at the end of our run, often at our favorite post run coffee venue, the North Boulder branch of Spruce Confections (the scones, especially raspberry-cream cheese, hit the spot after a hard run).

My sparring partners were Fabio Casadio and Sebastien B. who’d come to Boulder to get in some hard training at altitude as part of their build up to the Boston Marathon. Fabio and Sebastien are hoping to break their PRs of 2:42 and 2:29 respectively. So for 4 days we went at it hammer and tongs – until we could barely stand anymore let alone run.

We did most of our running on the North Boulder trails. They offer undulating off-road running with breathtaking (what breath there was left to take) vistas of the snow sprinkled Flatirons, mountains which visually define Boulder. The sun shone and the skies were a perfect blue. Temperatures were often in the 40s. But when the wind blew the windchill took it into single digit fahrenheit.

Here’s a blow-by-blow account:

Day 1 – steady 10 miles – http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/152256442

Day 2 AM – steady 6 miles –http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/152256446

Day 2 PM –  4 mile fast tempo with warm up and long warm down – http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/152256451

Day 3 – 13 mile steady run – http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/152853571

Day 4 – 14 mile steady run – http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/152853606